Growing Potatoes

Growing Potatoes | Crop Circles | Potato Crop Circle | Sweet

GROW GREAT POTATOES

To grow great potatoes is the result of good practices throughout the production operation. As in other crops, the quality of the seed stock is a primary factor influencing quantity and quality of yield. Only disease-free, certified roots should be planted. Roots 1.5 to 3 inches in diameter produce the largest number of vigorous plants. On average 30 percent of a field grown potato crop is lost to cold. Open field plantings typically produce fewer potatoes than beds covered with a plastic cover or germination cloth.

SWEET POTATO

A great way to start preparing the area for sweet potato is to excavate an area about 2 feet deep and 2 feet larger than the flood irrigation trench. Fill the trench with an aged mix of animal and plant compost level with the surrounding ground. Using a rake, create the circular earthen berms that form the inside and outside edges of the trench. Fill the interior of the inner berm with soil level with the top of the berm. Make sure the entire growing area is level. Cover the entire growing area with a Crop Circle weed barrier. Place the irrigator at the center of the farm Crop Circle and connect the irrigator. Weigh down the four corners of the barrier to prevent dislodgement from wind blow. Plant a young cultivar in each opening after the plants have hardened. Depending on the climate in your area, it takes about 2 to 3 weeks for the plants to start running. As with all potato varieties, the plants begin growing potatoes as soon as flowers appear.

Growing potatoes with Crop Circles triple potato yield. Crop Circle farmers growing sweet potatoes earn thousands growing more potato per acre.

crop circle potato crop circles

Potato Crop Circle

A potato Crop Circle grows about 60 potato plants. Sweet potato is the preferred variety because of its prolific production and vining charateristics.

digging potatoes

Sweet Potato

We harvested 700 pounds of Sweet Potato 15 weeks after transplant. We planted “Jewel” thought to be the most versatile sweet potato, with copper-colored skin and moist, bright orange flesh. We averaged about 5 per plant.